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How do we end hatred and racism?    Watch children.  That's how.

09/17/2019 09:54:13 AM

Sep17

B'nai Moshe

We saw this clip and it just warmed our hearts. It reminds us that hate and racism are not natural. They are learned behaviors. How do we end it?  The answer is easy. Don't teach it. It's as simple as that. We can all learn a lesson in being a friend from children.  Watch this clip and tell me you don't love it.

CLICK HERE to watch this clip. It will warm your heart.

 


 

 

"Welcome Home" is  not just a   slogan

10/30/2019 12:45:20 PM

Oct30

Miranda Brooks

Congregation B'nai Moshe always greets those visiting with "welcome home."  Whether you have been a member for 50 years or may be visiting for the very first time you are welcomed home to B'nai Moshe.  It doesn't even matter if your are Jewish or not.  While there is a sign right above the entrance to the building that reads "Welcome Home" it is not just a slogan.  It's B'nai Moshe.

B'nai Moshe's Unique  Gabbai Makes Us Proud

10/02/2019 01:21:48 PM

Oct2

B'nai Moshe

If you were at B'nai Moshe on the second day of Rosh Hashanah, you may have taken notice of something we believe to be unique and it happened at B'nai Moshe.  It is unique not only in metro-Detroit but we would not be going out on a limb to say in the nation. 

Quite possibly, because of the inclusive family atmosphere at B'nai Moshe, you may not have even given it a second thought.  And in many ways, not noticing might actually make this all the more special.

I am speaking of the gabbai on the second day of Rosh Hashanah.  The job of the gabbai is a difficult and important role.  The gabbai is sort of the quarterback of the torah service.  The gabbai calls up (in Hebrew) each person who is given the honor of an aliyah to the torah.   There are several prayers which must be said, adding the Hebrew name of the honoree and saying a mishabeirach (prayer of good health) for the previous honoree.  The words are quite different on the high holidays than they are on shabbat.  It's not easy, to say the least.

B'nai Moshe's lead gabbai on the second day of Rosh Hashanah was Yael Plotnick.  Yael is a 21-year old student at the University of Michigan and has grown up at B'nai Moshe.  Even more impressive was that Yael took on this same role last year when she was but 20.  Usually the role of the gabbai is given to a member of the clergy or a seasoned male ritual leader.  At B'nai Moshe this role was filled beautifully by a 21-year old female and we couldn't be prouder.

We'd love to hear from any other synagogue in the country or world who can boast such a claim.

These opportunities can only exist in a synagogue that is open to change and is blind to traditional gender roles.  Congratulations Yael on a job well done!

How Do You Embrace Your Jewish Identity?

09/17/2019 10:17:35 AM

Sep17

B'nai Moshe

B'nai Moshe's theme for the High Holidays and throughout the year is "How do YOU embrace YOUR Jewish Identity?"  We sent out cards to our members asking them to finish the statement "I feel connected to my Judasim when I ... "

We'll have all the response cards posted for display on the High Holidays.  Here are some of those that have been turned in so far.   Please submit your responses by emailing I Feel Connected to My Judaism When I ... and let us know when you feel connected to your Judaism.   

"When I attend services and when I eat." - age 87

"When I participate in family traditions." - age 31

"When I learn of Israel's accomplishments - humanatarian, scientific or medical." - age 75

"When I host large holiday dinners with friends and family." - age 70 

"When I wake up in the morning and all through the day." - age 80

"Whe nI light candles on Friday night." - age 66

"When I hear people speaking Hebrew in places I wouldn't expect." - age 75

"When I volunteer at Yad Ezra each week." - Age 68

 

Tue, December 10 2019 12 Kislev 5780